Courses

 

NAFRI partners with the National Wildfire Coordinating Group (NWCG), National Training Priorities and subject matter experts to manage and deliver advanced level curriculum for the Interagency Wildland Fire and Aviation Management Community. 

For Information about NAFRI's 2022 Courses, please visit the NAFRI Course Catalog Page on the Wildland Fire Learning Portal.

NWCG Courses

Course Target Group:

Individuals who will be called upon to establish and supervise an expanded dispatch organization and who have met prerequisite training and experience at the Expanded Dispatch Support Dispatcher (EDSD) level.


Course Description:

This course is designed to train individuals in the function and responsibilities of a Supervisory Dispatcher within an Incident Support Organization. Student selected for this course must be capable of performing as an Expanded Dispatch Support Dispatcher in all functional areas of an expanded dispatch. The course will provide trainees with a working knowledge of the necessary management skills and operational procedures for successful performance as a Supervisory Dispatcher.

The course is intended to be an interactive experience, requiring the trainee to interact with the materials, the faculty, and fellow students. The course consists of a 40-hour pre-course test, discussions, exercises and final exam. It is designed to take 32 hours to present. Class size is limited to 40 students.


Course Objectives:

Given an incident situation, a briefing from the appropriate agency management entity, and incident objectives, students will be able to:

  • Develop and manage an effective organization to meet present and future needs of an incident.
  • Utilize available information to establish expanded dispatch priorities in consultation with the appropriate agency management entity.

Total Hours: 72


Course Prerequisites:

  • Qualified as expanded dispatch support dispatcher (EDSD). Recommend experience in all functional areas (overhead, crews, equipment, aircraft and supply).
  • Successfully complete a pre-course pass/fail assessment that takes approximately 40 hours to complete.

Success in D-510 will depend on the student’s ability in leadership and organizational knowledge as contained in:

  • L-380 Fireline Leadership
  • ICS-300 Intermediate ICS
  • D-310 Expanded Dispatch Support Dispatcher
  • Agency-specific supervision courses

 D-312, Aircraft Dispatcher, is highly recommended.

 

 

 

For General Course Information, please visit the NWCG L580 Leadership is Action Course Information Page. 

 

For information on upcoming sessions, please visit the L580 Leadership is Action Course Page on the Wildland Fire Learning Portal.

Course Target Group:

This course is targeted to resource managers, wildland fire planning personnel and line officers who want to enhance their knowledge and understanding of fire management and fire ecology.

  • Natural and cultural resource management specialists, endangered species biologists, compliance specialists (NEPA, SHPO), land, fire and fuels management planners. Individuals involved with planning, implementation, and monitoring of fire and ecosystem management programs.
  • Public affairs, information officers, education and other specialists or individuals who need to communicate to diverse audiences fire management and ecological principles and practices.
  • Agency administrators, (i.e., line officers) senior managers, Staff Officers, Tribal leaders, and other key partners. (i.e., community leaders, local government, state officials, non-government partners, et cetera.)
  • Fire Management Officers and Assistant Fire Management Officers.

Course Description:

Through lectures, case studies, a field trip, and interaction between students and faculty, the course will:

  • Explore the role of fire and fire management in ecosystem management.
  • Examine historical, social, political, legal, economic, and environment factors critical to fire management.
  • Provide the students with concepts, technologies and methods to actively engage in ecosystem management across the landscape.

Course Size is limited to 100 Students


Course Objectives:

  • Convey the significant role of fire management across a diversity of ecosystems.
  • Demonstrate the complexity and benefits of integrating fire and landscape management with social, political, legal, economic and environmental factors.
  • Provide students with strategies, concepts, reference resources, and models to facilitate ecosystem management decisions.
  • Reinforce fundamental ecological concepts as they relate to fire on the landscape.

Total Hours: 40


Course Prerequisites:

None

 

 

Course Target Group:

This course is intended for line officers with a journey level of experience overseeing a wildland fire program.  Forest Service Forest Supervisor/Deputy Forest Supervisor levels, National Park Service and Bureau of Indian Affairs, Superintendent/Deputy Superintendent levels, Bureau of Land Management Field Office/District Manager levels, and Fish & Wildlife Service Refuge Management Project Leader level, and state and local Agency Administrators.


Course Description:

This course was developed using an experiential and collaborative approach to learning. It is designed to be highly-engaging in dialogue, exercises, interactive scenarios, and simulations. The course is a comprehensive look at the Agency Administrator’s leadership role in highly complex issues within fire management programs. Topics include Federal Wildland Fire Management Policy, Fuels and Prescribed Fire Policy, risk management and decision-making, critical relationships, development of adaptive and resilient programs, and hosting complex incidents. The complex fire situation is highlighted with the intent to provide a comprehensive understanding of the processes necessary to effectively manage the situation. Included are the Agency Administrator’s briefing, developing and conveying clear intent and objectives, creating a healthy command climate and relationships within their teams and among partners and stakeholders, and other critical items.


Course Objectives:

  • Identify the Agency Administrator’s responsibilities to provide leadership in fire and fuels management.  
  • Gain a common understanding of all the fire management agencies national policy, Agency Administrator responsibility and accountability, and authority for all fire management actions.
  • Understand the importance of fire as an essential ecological process and the role of fire management programs in achieving desired future conditions.  
  • Gain a common understanding of risk informed decision-making and safety philosophy in the context of wildland fire program management.

Total Hours: 50-60


Course Prerequisites:

M-581, Fire Program Management, an Overview, OR
LFML, Local Fire Management Leadership.

 

 

 

For General Course Information, please visit the NWCG RX510 Advanced Fire Effects Course Information Page

 

For information on upcoming sessions, please visit the RX510 Advanced Fire Effects Course Page on the Wildland Fire Learning Portal.

 

Course Target Group:

  • Personnel desiring to be qualified as long-term analyst (LTAN) or a fire behavior analyst (FBAN) completing position task book items relating to spatial fire analysis or a geospatial analysis technical specialist (THSP).

Course Description:

S-495 is an intensive course which prepares the long term analyst (LTAN) and fire behavior analyst (FBAN) to use a variety of geospatial fire analysis tools in order to provide short-, mid-, and long-term fire behavior forecasts. It is the equivalent of a graduate-level class on geospatial fire modeling, conveying the latest processes and technology to assess weather, climatology, historic fires, fuels, and biophysical attributes to develop deterministic and probabilistic fire growth assessments.

This course is presented using a blended learning approach. It employs a mix of required online distance learning and a final instructor-led session in a formal classroom setting. Students must allow for up to 120-hours to complete the distance learning portion of the course spread over a five-month period from November-March (extended to May due to partial government shutdown). The online distance learning is officially part of the course and is not pre-course work. Distance learning includes a number of quizzes that count toward the overall student score and final course grade. As such, students are required to successfully complete the online distance learning section with a satisfactory score on all tested materials in order to attend the final classroom portion.

Due to the intensive nature of S-495, participants can expect long days during the classroom portion of the class with short lectures followed by hands on individual and group exercises, breakout discussions, daily quizzes, a final exam, and optional evening help sessions.


Course Objectives:

  • Concepts taught will help an LTAN and FBAN perform at an acceptable level on a national basis without regard to geographic boundaries.
  • Prepare future LTANs with advanced geospatial fire analysis, interpretation and application skills, preparatory for S-590.
  • Introduce future FBANs to geospatial fire analysis, interpretation and application skills preparatory for completing task book items related to geospatial analysis.
  • Equip technical specialists with geospatial fire analysis, assessment, and interpretation skills.
  • Provide continuing education to qualified LTANs, FBANs, and technical specialists by providing the most recent advancements in geospatial fire analyses.

Total Hours: 164


Course Prerequisites:

Training Prerequisites:

All nominees are required to have successfully completed the following courses prior to applying to the course for the November start of online course work.

  • Advanced Wildland Fire Behavior Calculations (S-490).
  • Intermediate National Fire Danger Rating System (S-491).

Online Assessment:

All nominees are required to successfully complete a pre-selection qualifying exam testing knowledge of fire behavior principles, practices, and skills taught in S-390, S-490 and S-491. This is a 4-hour time limited exam taken online.

  • A passing score (70% or better) on the S-495 Qualifying Exam.
  • Successful completion of all distance learning materials with a cumulative score of 70% or better on all Unit Exercises and Exams.

Students not seeking certification can access the online self-paced lessons without prerequisites or tested material.  The self-paced modules may be accessed here.

 

Computer Requirements:

All participants attending S-495 will need to provide their own laptop and should be proficient in its use. A detailed listing of hardware and software needs will be included in the course selection letter.

Additional Information:

Success in S-495 will depend on the student's commitment to completing the distance learning training. Distance learning materials are meant to provide the appropriate level of background, foundational knowledge and concepts to be successful in the classroom.  This information will be further developed through instruction and exercises during instructor-led training in the classroom.

Additional skills and knowledge useful for the course:

  • Obtain an account in WFDSS in order to become proficient in navigating and using the various fire modeling applications.
  • Proficient in the use of FireFamilyPlus software.
  • Proficient in the use of BehavePlus software.
  • Familiarity with LANDFIRE data products.
  • Familiarity with GIS topics.

“See link to Session Details, above.” 

Course Target Group:

Any person qualified to fill a national level interagency Type 1 Incident Management Team position as an Incident Command, Planning Section Chief, Operations Section Chief, Logistics Section Chief, Finance Section Chief, Safety Officer, or Public Information Officer, or any person to become certified in one of these positions at the Type 1 completxity level and Agency Administrators preparing for the potential to host Complex Incidents.


Course Description:

Using classroom lecture, dialogue, exercises and simulated incidents, students will develop their understanding and demonstrate the abilities to effectively function in a Command and General Staff (C&G) position of a Type 1 Incident Management Team and/or as an Agency Administrator hosting Complex Incidents.  Students will discuss and practice the applicability of management principles to the incident management job, and the special considerations of incident management in differing geographic areas of the nation.

S520 incorporates experiential learning opportunities in the practice and application of critical concepts and responsibilities of Type 1 C&G Staff and Agency Administrators, coupled with active coaching, feedback and performance assessments.    

Early Nomination Rationale: Early nomination has been requested to give those nominated the necessary mentoring and pre-course assignments for the course.

For current course information, refer to the NAFRI web site: http://www.nafri.gov


Course Objectives:

Given a simulated complex fire situation, students will effectively perform functional and team responsibilities. Individual performance must meet established criteria for successful completion of the course.


Total Hours: 60


Course Prerequisites:

Individuals must be functionally certified and qualified at the Type 2 level for the position they will be filling at the course.

Nominees are required to submit a complete nomination package through their Geographic Area Training Representative (GATR), which must include a nomination form, a current fire qualifications record summary and a narrative statement giving a brief background of the person nominated, with a description of the intended use of the skills developed as a result of attending S520. Previous attendance at S-420 is recommended.

Satisfactory completion of UNIT-I (pre-course) work.

 

 

Course Target Group:

The target audience includes individuals:

  • Responsible for resource analysis, decision support and decision making based on outputs from National Fire Danger Rating System (NFDRS) at the local/state/national level and corresponding positions;
  • Responsible for Intelligence, Predictive Services, and/or Fire Weather Forecasting;
  • FBANs, LTANs and GSANs who desire advanced NFDRS application and use;
  • Responsible for providing technical support and oversight for NFDRS;
  • Who will become geographic area NFDRS instructors;
  • With a passion to become the next generation to carry NFDRS forward.

Course Description:

Advanced NFDRS is the next level of analytical instruction above S491 which focuses on the role of fire danger rating in resource decision making, through development of a fire danger rating operating plan. Participants will be provided the skills to analyze and troubleshoot fire danger rating from the fire weather station scale to multiple fire danger rating areas. The course will provide individuals the technical skills to serve as instructors for geographic area level courses for all wildland fire agencies using NFDRS. Advanced NFDRS is a national level course. As such, participants can expect long days, evening and weekend work. In order to receive credit for course, participants must stay through entire course. Students will need to complete approximately 24 hours of pre-course work.


Course Objectives:

  • Through the development of an operating plan participants will demonstrate skills required to design, setup, and manage NFDRS at the local level. These include:
    • Identifying the fire problem(s).
    • Delineating Fire Danger Rating Areas.
    • Verifying input data used for NFDRS.
    • Applying NFDRS tools to inform and support fire management decisions.
    • Documenting the analysis, decisions, and operational processes.
  • Describe the relationship of NFDRS to other wildland fire  decision support tools.
  • Demonstrate how fire danger rating supports local, state, Geographic Area and National decision-making.
  • Introduce new NFDRS related technology
  • Participants will develop technical knowledge to support Geographic Area NFDRS training and implementation.

Total Hours: 88


Course Prerequisites:

  • Intermediate National Fire Danger Rating System (S-491)
  • Complete pre-course work.
  • Pre-course work will be emailed directly to students

 

Computer Requirements

Students must bring their Agency laptop to use during the course at NAFRI. If you do not have a laptop available to you, there are in limited supply at NAFRI and are on a first come first serve basis; use of your own agency laptop is strongly suggested.

 

 

Course Target Group:

For people responsible for managing complex incidents that will be available to participate on a National Interagency Area Command team as an Area Commander (ACDR), Assistant Area Commander Logistics (ACLC), Assistant Area Commander Planning (ACPC) or Area Command Aviation Coordinator (ACAC).


Course Description:

This course was developed using an experiential and collaborative approach to learning. It is designed to be highly engaging in dialogue, exercises, interactive scenarios and simulations. The course is a comprehensive look at the Area Command Team's role(s) in the management of highly complex and/or multiple incidents, with an objective of understanding the interaction of Area Command and other incident organizations, agencies, and political entities.

Topics include; developing and maintaining interagency relationships, area command tools and planning cycles, functional responsibilities, evaluating organizational effectiveness, transitions,
transfer of command and demobilization. Also emphasized is the need to adapt to complex problem sets, engage in deliberate risk management practices, develop strategic alternatives and
use of decision support tools as well as procedures to identify, manage and prioritize incidents and allocation of critical resources.

Representatives and Subject Matter Experts from the Agency Administrator and State, Regional Operations Staff and Geographic Area Multi-Agency Coordinating Groups will participate fully in
the course to present the full range of coordination efforts necessary in managing incidents at the Area Command complexity level.


Course Objectives:

Given a simulated multi-incident fire situation, students will effectively perform functional and team responsibilities. Individual's performance must meet established criteria for successful completion of the course.


Total Hours: 36


Course Prerequisites:

For ACDR, ACLC and ACPC:  Prerequisites include having successfully completed S-520 Advanced Incident Management, Complex Incident Management Course (CIMC) or All-Hazard Advanced Incident Management (AAIM), and are Qualified as ICT1, LSC1 or PSC1

For ACAC:  Prerequisites include Qualified as AOBD and/or Unit Aviation Officer 

 

 

Non NWCG Courses

Course Target Group:

Any state employee designated to fill a state level incident management team position as an Incident Commander, Planning Section Chief, Operations Section Chief, Logistics Section Chief, Finance Section Chief, Safety Officer, Information Officer, and Liaison Officer.


Course Description:

CIMC - Complex Incident Management Course

Using classroom lecture and simulated incidents the student will understand the role and function of an incident management team, the applicability of management principles to the incident management job, and the special considerations of incident management within geographic areas of the nation. http://www.nafri.gov/pages/description_cimc.htm

Nomination Process

A notification of training letter will be sent to each State Fire Chief’s office advising them of upcoming training and of the training location. The training location will rotate between the three NASF regions (Northeast, South and West). Teams from the host region will have priority of attendance.


State Fire Chiefs will then provide a list of candidates and their team positions to the CIMC Executive Secretary for CIMC Steering Committee review and selection. The CIMC Executive Secretary will then send out final selection letters along with course information and reading materials.


Course Objectives:

The Complex Incident Management Course (CIMC) is a partnership between the National Association of State Foresters and the U.S. Forest Service to provide a national incident management training program that addresses multi-jurisdictional and all-hazard issues, including wildfire, that confront state emergency responders.

Course objectives are to train command staff positions to function as qualified state incident management teams who are able to assist their state forestry organizations and state emergency departments in the management of large or highly complex wildfires and other all hazard incidents. The focus of the course is to better prepare team members to address the unique and challenging management needs associated with these kinds of incidents.


Total Hours: 40


Course Prerequisites:

I / S-420 and Position Training

 

Course Description:

NAFA II is designed to provide aerial firefighters an advanced training experience to NAFA, utilizing flight simulator hardware and software, sand table exercises and classroom interaction. NAFA II simulations and problem solving exercises will enhance the aerial firefighter’s effectiveness and safety awareness by providing complex problem solving tasks while simulating a multi-aircraft fire airspace environment.

Pilots will fight fires from a simulated cockpit and will experience various aircraft emergencies and responses while over a fire environment. Real time fire scenarios will be utilized from simple initial attack to a complex fire environment.

 

  • NAFA II is a contract requirement for Level II Seat Pilots to obtain a Level I Upgrade.
  • NAFA II is a contract requirement for Level I Seat Pilots every three years (NAFA III meets this contract requirement and is the preferred option for existing Level 1 SEAT Pilots needing NAFA II in 2021).
  • NAFA II can serve as the NAFA contract requirement for airtankers and scooper AKPs every three years and AKCs annually.

Objectives:

To provide aerial firefighters an advanced training experience to NAFA, utilizing flight simulator hardware and software, sandtable exercises and classroom interaction. NAFA II simulations and problem solving exercises will enhance the aerial firefighter’s effectiveness and safety awareness by providing complex problem solving tasks while simulating a multi-aircraft fire airspace environment.


Target Group:

NAFA II is for personnel who have attended NAFA, who are interested in building on that knowledge and want to obtain advanced level of mission simulation training in the wildland fire airspace environment.


Total Hours: 16


Prerequisites:

Successful completion of NAFA

 

 

Course Description:

The Facilitated Learning Analysis(FLA) and Coordinated Response Protocol(CRP) are group learning approaches to review a broad spectrum of unintended outcomes or close calls ranging from fatalities and escaped fires to vehicle accidents. Through lectures, case studies, and interaction between participants and faculty, the course will:

 

• Illustrate concepts, technologies and methods to actively engage the FLA and CRP processes. 

• Examine case studies that describe a paradigm shift from blame to learning in the wake of an accident. 

• Demonstrate the use of storytelling to exploit accidents and other unintended outcomes as learning events. 

• Underline the concept of sense-making to enable FLA and CRP team members to overcome hindsight bias. 

• Move organizations towards a learning culture. The workshop is limited to 56 participants


Objectives:

Prepare participants to serve as FLA and CRP team members.


Target Group:

Personnel interested and available to participate on review teams analyzing all types of accidents and near-misses. The Workshop participation is not limited to Fire and Aviation Management employees.


Total Hours: 40


Prerequisites:

None, However preference will be given to individuals with experience in risk management, safety management and accident investigations.

 

 

Course Description:

This course is designed to provide aerial firefighters an advanced training experience to NNAFA - National Aerial Firefighting Academy and N9048 - National Aerial Firefighting Academy II, utilizing sand table exercises and classroom interaction. These simulations and problem solving exercises will enhance the aerial firefighter’s effectiveness and safety awareness by providing complex problem-solving tasks while simulating a multi-aircraft fire airspace environment.
 

  • This course will meet the contract requirements for existing Level 1 SEAT Pilots (preferred option for existing Level 1 SEAT pilots in 2021) and for airtanker and scooper AKPs every three years and AKCs annually that do not need flight simulation.
  • Please note No flight simulators are used in this course. Those that need to have flight simulation will have to attend NAFA II in McClellan, CA.
  • This class is NOT appropriate, nor will it meet contract requirements for Pilots needing NAFA II for their upgrade to a Level 1 endorsement.

Objectives:

To provide aerial firefighters an advanced training experience to NAFA, utilizing sand table exercises and classroom interaction. These simulations and problem solving exercises will enhance the aerial firefighter’s effectiveness and safety awareness by providing complex problem solving tasks while simulating a multi-aircraft fire airspace environment.


Target Group:

NAFA III is for personnel who have attended NAFA and NAFA II and are interested in building on that knowledge and who do not need flight simulation.


Total Hours: 16


Prerequisites:

NNAFA - National Aerial Firefighting Academy
N9048 - National Aerial Firefighting Academy II


 

Course Description:

The National Aerial Firefighting Academy (NAFA) is a training effort by and for personnel directly involved in aerial retardant and water delivery. The intent is to educate both Agency and Contract personnel using subject matter experts from both sectors.

This course is geared toward those who are new to the firefighting environment.

NAFA will provide participants information needed to safely and effectively work together in a congested airspace over a wildland fire incident. Tactics, operations and experience are integrated into this aerial firefighting training. The course provides a look into the “other pilot’s” job. which provides an important perspective needed to achieve the same goal: support the firefighters on the ground with aerial resources safely, effectively and efficiently.  

 

  • NAFA is a contract requirement for new Airtanker, Scooper and Level 2 SEAT pilots.
  • NAFA, NAFA III and/or proof of having reviewed the USFS Airtanker Pilot Training Program is required for Airtanker Second in Command (AKCs) annually.
  • NAFA or NAFA III is a contract requirement for Airtanker Pilot in Command (AKPs) every three years. 

Objectives:

By the end of this course,  students will:
 

  • Understand operations and communications within the Fire Traffic Area in order to safely support the ground firefighters. 
  • Increase aerial firefighting knowledge by integrating tactics, operations and coordination of various resources to enhance their effectiveness and safety.
  • Have a basic understanding of  aerial firefighting to include dispatching, fire terminology, airbase operations, human factors, fire behavior and the Incident Command System.
  • Improve knowledge of Fire policies, drop patterns, coverage levels, strategies, techniques and factors influencing aerial application on Wildland Fire.

 


Target Group:

Contract and agency personnel directly involved in aerial retardant and water delivery:
 

  • Large Airtanker(LAT)Pilots
  • Scooper Pilots
  • Modular Airborne Firefighting Systems (MAFFS) Pilots
  • Single Engine Airtanker (SEAT) Pilots
  • Type I, Type II and Type III Helicopter Pilots
  • Very Large Airtanker (VLAT) Pilots
  • Air Attack Pilots
  • Agency Air Tactical Group Supervisors (ATGS)
  • Agency Leadplane Pilots
  • Agency Dispatchers

Total Hours: 32


Prerequisites:

Is a member of NAFA specified target group listed above.
 

 

Course Description: 

Stress First Aid (SFA) is a self-care and peer support model that comprises a set of supportive actions designed to help individuals assist each other in reducing the negative impacts of stress. SFA was designed originally to support military personnel, and subsequently tailored to support a wide-range of occupations, including Wildland firefighters, EMS personnel, law enforcement, safety and natural resource professions. SFA is designed to be attentive to multiple sources of stress, practical, flexible, and tailored to the specific styles and needs of those involved.


Objectives: 

Upon completion, students will be able to share the peer model with their home units, families, as well as instruct to the greater populace.<

 

Total Hours: 

There are 2 versions of the Train the Trainer Course.

  • The in-person version takes place over 3 days at NAFRI in Tucson, Arizona.  In addition to traditional lecture, students are placed into groups of 5-6 with an experienced coach for deeper dives into the course content through peer to peer discussion.
  • The virtual Train the Trainer Course occurs over 5, three-hour sessions and consist of lecture and small group breakouts with an experienced coach. 

 

 

Course Description:

  • Agency Administrator Guide
  • Notification
  • Modified Incident Management Team
  • Family Liaison/Hospital Liaison
  • Survivor /Agency Support
  • Benefits for Survivors
  • Dealing with the Media
  • Agency Guidance for Memorials/Funerals
  • Honor Guard
  • Investigation Process
  • Continued Support

Objectives:

This course is intended to give some guidelines for assisting employees, family, and other survivors of an employee who has sustained a major injury, or has died off-duty or in the line of duty.


Target Group:


Total Hours: 36


Prerequisites:

None